Photography in 123

Even though you don’t need to own super expensive gear or don’t need to be an expert to take shots like these…

…you’ll have a hard time finding any reliable source to show you how without spending a small fortune…

There are a host of online blogs that will “teach” you how to take photos.  And I’ve visited many myself (albeit a small fraction of the number of blogs that likely exist).

1. Basic or too general – many sites don’t give a detailed instruction on how to take the shot.  They tend to be very general and are hard to put into practice.

2. Ultra-time consuming – to find what you’re are looking for, you will have to spend many hours in blogs trying to find the info you need.

3. You are not their focus – at least, not as a student.  Many photographers post online for some “online love” – likes, follows, kudos, etc.  They care that people enjoy their photo, but not about teaching you how to take one.

Learning by trial and error is actually a method I do recommend for new photographers…sometimes.

It’s power is in the fact that as humans, we learn so much better when we make mistakes before we get it right.  When that happens, we tend to learn the lesson much better.

Trial and error can take an incredible amount of time to reach success.  If you have lots of time to burn, then I say go for it.

And the quality of these lessons are often excellent.  I’ve taken many photography courses over the years and found all of them great.

But the downfall is professional lessons are expensive.  Expect to spend hundreds of dollars, and they will be very focused on one topic.

If you want to take truly stunning photos with your DSLR – ones that will impress friends and be "wall worthy" – then keep reading to learn just how to do that.

You see, it really does come down to learning the key techniques that are used by pros over and over again, to produce consistent, reliable results.

The trouble is, you normally have to put up a significant amount of time or money to get those results.

I was one of those guys who would never stop taking pictures.  It drove my friends crazy (apparently taking a camera to Vegas is a no-no?).  It drove my wife crazy (yes, I DO have to stop every 10 feet to take a photo!).  And it drove everyone around me crazy (why does this guy have a giant camera at the baseball game?).

And with those lessons, and with the continual trial and error, and with the experimenting, my photography developed so far that one day I realized it was my photos on the walls now, and not someone else’s (that is extremely satisfying).

Because they knew what I’ve told you.  Learning from blogs and trial and error is time consuming, and pros charge a boatload of money.

So I started creating a manual to help my friends learn how to take the same great photos that I take, but in a fraction of the time.

As that manual grew into a book of knowledge, which I continually add to.  It has become my reference guide.

It’s your one-stop manual for learning everything you need to know about taking stunning photos likes the ones on these pages.

The book is designed to be efficient, straight to the point, and get your ability to where it needs to be – FAST!

It’s time for you to leap ahead of the months and years of being a "some day photographer".  You know the one…

By now you must be eager to skip past that stage and start taking amazing photos and be the one your friends come to for questions.

If anyone tells you they know each and every style of photography and will teach it to you, then run away!

What I can teach you are the styles that I’ve spend the most time with and had the most enjoyment with.  And I think that these styles will be interesting to many people and be practical for most of you.

If none of these styles match to yours, then that’s ok too.  There are other sites out there that may help you.

There is something mesmerizing about getting an huge photo of an amazing scene that you don’t normally see.

This section will teach you my techniques for getting in close, using lighting properly, and adding some creative effects.

And the reason I love it is I can capture the passion of the location and what I feel about the scene.

Whether vacationing in an exotic location, visiting a nearby park, and checking out some local monuments, this is a fantastic style of photography to develop.

Artistic photography is amazing.  It may have an air of "gallery work that no one gets"…, but it really isn’t that.

I view it as using your camera, environment, and ability to be able to capture a moment or object in a different manner…in a different light.

There is a art to framing the animals well in a photos and bringing out the context of their environment.

But whatever you do, please don’t disturb the animals.  We are in their territory, so respect that.

With blobs and blobs of run on paragraphs, you have to review the same material over and over again to see if you even learned anything.  Does that bring back some rough memories of school?

I’ve spent a few years redesigning the layout and changing how I teach to ensure you get the most out of it.

While I’ve given it to all my friends who are interested in photography, the reality is I put a lot into gaining all this information.  So I’ll like to get a little bit back.  I’m sure you understand, right?

If you are willing to put it lots of…